As a psychotherapist, it is crucial to disclose that in my years of experience working with individualsand even marriages experiencing depression, one of the most devastating aspects of dealing withdepression is the stigma and negative criticism that comes from others. Furthermore, people may noteven know that their behaviors and comments are being negative or hurtful and sometimes evenmake the depression feel worse.

With this in mind, here are 20 simple things we can remember when interacting with those that maybe having a fight with depression. Any one of these points will not only help with the stigmasurrounding depression, but may even help the individual dealing with depression.

1. They are strong in character
In a recent Tedx talk, psychiatrist and philosopher, Dr. Neel Burton explains that depression canrepresent a deeper search for meaning and significance in life. A person experiencing depression canbe seen as working to make sense of life and trying to achieve more, fix more and improve more.Moreover, depression can be a way of preparing a better and even healthier future for ourselves andthose around us. Dr. Burton goes on to mention that some of the most influential and inspirationalpeople have dealt with depression such as, Abraham Lincoln and Winston Churchill. Their search forpeace, happiness and peace led their hearts and minds into the pit of depression, but they ended upchanging the course of history.

It takes immense will and transparency to acknowledge the presence of depression, but it alsopushes people to create answers in the darkest moments in life. In conclusion, depression can takepeople into the deep woods of our souls and help clear out any unneeded weeds, or shrubs that maybe hiding the beauty of life. It is not an act of fear, cowardliness, or ignorance.

2. They love it when you reach out to them unexpectedly
I believe that one of the biggest assumptions of someone dealing with a bout of depression is thatthey want to be left alone. Although that could seem true at times, it is a dose of healthy socialmedicine when a friend, a loved one, or a neighbor drops by to say hello. One growing theory aboutthe root of depression in our society is the lack of social relationships in our communities and even inour families. There is a constant dose of emptiness and disconnection in our everyday interactionsdue to overworking, television and technology. People managing depression need more company,more friends, more people reaching out to them, and more people wanting to spend time with them,not the opposite.

The next time you find yourself thinking about someone that is going through a depressive state,think of a nice, engaging and friendly act you can show them, instead of choosing to stay away fromthem. If we use the example of Jesus, He was always with people. To take it further, Jesus chose tospend time with trusted associates and not be alone too often. In fact, it was when He was alone thatSatan chose to tempt him the most.

Consider your loved ones and friends that are experiencing depression as a needing you and yourpresence more than ever. It is interesting to think about the times when I was growing up and mymother would always make it a point to lean on her sisters and brother during times of trouble orloneliness. Family and community is a natural remedy for depression. Let’s start to use it moreoften.

Mother Teresa put it very well, “The most terrible poverty is loneliness, and the feeling of beingunloved.”